“Boško Buha” remains in public ownership

The memorial complex “Boško Buha”, located on Jabuka mountain near the town of Prijepolje, has been exempted from the bankruptcy estate of “Putnik”, a company which will be put on sale at the end of February.

Stop the privatization of Boško Buha Memorial Complex

Boško Buha Memorial Complex at Jabuka near Prijepolje has been announced to be sold off in late January. However, a part of the public opposes the allienation of this important symbol of freedom fight and former social progress, stating that together with it we sell away the “noble ideas of pacifism, antifascism, and struggle for justice and equality”.

Plundering through privatisation was allowed by law – “The truth about the 24 cases”

The same people who robbed the state were involved in the making of the law. Participants of the panel discussion “The truth about the 24 cases”, organized by the Centre for investigative journalism (CINS) concluded that the Law on Privatisation allowed corruption during the transition period in Serbia, which lead to systemic deterioration of economy and society.

Exodus of professional drivers from Serbia

Professional city bus drivers are leaving Serbia with a one-way ticket increasingly often. The prolongation of working hours, low salaries and irrational business policies of the City public transport company Belgrade do not only motivate the drivers to emigrate, but also serve as arguments for further privatization of the company.

BusPlus ticketing system in public transport: a profit-making tool

Private-public partnerships in public services sector represent just another instrument for private businesses to get their hands on public funds. BusPlus is a typical example of such business model in Serbia whose downsides have been obvious for years now.

Rory Archer: Leftists should not shy away from assessing the defective aspects of the socialist Yugoslav project

Rory Archer is a historian who researches social history of the Balkans in the 20th century and currently works at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies at the University College London. Archer explores the ways in which “ordinary” Yugoslavs interpreted economic, political and cultural tensions in late socialism and reacted to them. Since 2014 he has worked with Goran Musić on a research project titled Between Class and Nation: Working class communities in the eighties in Serbia and Montenegro. In 2015 he completed his PhD in Graz with a dissertation on the (in)affordability of housing among the working class in Belgrade, and in 2016 co-authored the book Social Inequalities and Disaffection in Yugoslavian Socialism.

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